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Origins of Ancient European Traditions Revealed in NEW 3rd EDITION of the classic Book of Elven-Faerie

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The legacy brought forth by the ancient Mesopotamian world (and Egyptian for that matter) did not die with them or we would not have anything near to the world that we have today. Their influence remains true. One might believe (or prefer to believe) that since we no longer live under the same conditions and guises of our ancestors, that we have somehow been able to escape their Truth – that it could not longer have application for us. Such is clearly not the case, nor did things end entirely with the lore and sagas of the Sumerians and Babylonians and other desert dwellers in a forgotten world – no indeed…

ElvenFaerieBK3rdTHUMB THE ORIGINAL UNDERGROUND CLASSIC RETURNS…
…in a newly formatted, revised & expanded economical third edition!

THE BOOK OF ELVEN-FAERIE:
Secrets of Dragon Kings, Druids, Wizards & The Pheryllt

(Third Edition)

by Joshua Free

An authentic, beautiful and uniquely complete Elvish Druidic Tradition revealed in the light of the mortal world… for the first time ever!


CRITICAL REVIEWS:

The Book of Elven-Faerie actually restores the historical basis of the modern ‘New Age’ movement, resulting from one seeker’s pursuits into the origins of the Druids.

The Book of Elven-Faerie became the literal genesis of the modern ‘Mardukite’ movement when privately released by prolific visionary writer, Joshua Free, in 2006.

The first part of The Book of Elven-Faerie describes the history of elves and faeries, how they were created and eventually disappeared. The second part dives into the practice of the Elven-Faerie tradition, complete with rituals for both groups and solitary practitioners. The book concludes with a section on less formal practices including working on the astral plane, sacred trees, herbalism and forest magick, including use of the Ogham.


ElvenFaerieBK3rdTHUMB Mesopotamia was only the beginning. As time and geography took its hold onto the ancient source traditions, it… evolved! If it can be said that this ancient stream is indeed our well-spring of civilization (examined very intensely in the Necronomicon Anunnaki Bible), and if we are to try to seek the most complete “systems” that have been brought forth through time and space, there are no others that compare to both the beauty and current and functional revival relevance as the Druids. Druidism is just as misunderstood and just as often misrepresented as the mythos and magick of ancient Sumeria, Babylon and Egypt – and, as it turns out, is directly related via a “dragon lineage” that was seeded by a race that we can identify with as “Elves” or “Faerie” begun in ancient Sumeria and Eurasia and carried forth into the Western World by distinct tribes of Europe.

The Book of Elven-Faerie is a revolutionary and controversial compendium of lore and magic reveals many things including:

ElvenFaerieBK3rdTHUMB * How ancient traditions of Mesopotamia (Sumerians, Babylonians, etc.) evolved into mystical, mythical and societal systems of Western Europe.
* How the most arcane practices shaped the customs and beliefs of the Western World.
* How modern folk magic can be traced back through the evolution of human civilization as carried by Druidic Tribes, the Tuatha de Dannan and ancient Anunnaki.

The Book of Elven-Faerie reveals an entire exploration into the Elven Way, Celtic Faerie Tradition and Danubian Druidism is offered — such as never seen before. Drawing from hundreds of sources, a reconstructionist Elven-Faerie tradition and system paradigm is presented by critically acclaimed Mardukite Druid, Joshua Free, including two complete grimoires that bring the magic and enchantment of nature, the elemental world, astral plane and woodlands to life!

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Uncovering the Pheryllt: First Systematizers of the Celts & Welsh Celtic Druidism with Joshua Free

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In ancient Keltia, the Druid Order consisted of learned men, those educated in Bardic Arts: cosmology, native history, legendary history of heroes and spirituality, penal laws and punishments, geography, healing, botanical medicine, astronomy, astrology and magic…
–Joshua Free explains in the preface to Pheryllt.

It is no wonder the Bardd is viewed as transmitter or catalyst of awen, the essence, divine spark or spirit of inspiration that the Greeks termed gnosis. It is to the ‘ebb and flow’ of the ‘awen field‘ that the poetic genius of Bards is attributed.

PHERYLLT_pb_cvr_frontcrop Diverse facets of knowledge, from practical magic, to the Bardic Arts, to Celtic history or even philosophies assimilated from cultures that Druids encountered throughout Europe, all appear in Douglas Monroe‘s works under the premise of being referenced from the Book of Pheryllt – or more accurately the Books of Fferyllt, a collective body of knowledge (what is literally called the Body of the Dragon in his preface to the 21 Lessons of Merlyn).

Following the lead of Monroe‘s citations, other cycles of Welsh material are also incorporated into the Book of Pheryllt, namely the Cad Goddeu (or Battle of the Trees) and the Gorchan of Maeldrew and both are contained in Volume I of the Books of Pheryllt. The three do not overlap or necessarily pertain to practical methodology in the sense the Seeker is left with when examining the “grimoire” portions of Douglas Monroe’s Lost Books of Merlyn. The “cantos” depicted on page 252 from that text are actually derived from a cycle of Norse mythology titled: Fridthjof’s Saga.

“The Druids believed in books more ancient than the flood. They styled them the ‘Books of Pheryllt’ and the writings of Hu.”
– Ignatius Donnelly, ‘Atlantis’

“Oxford is old, even in England… its foundations date from Alfred, and even from Arthur, if, as is alleged, the Pheryllt of the Druids had a seminary there.”
– Ralph Waldo Emerson, English Traits

An_Arch_Druid_in_His_Judicial_Habit According to Douglas Monroe a manuscript known as the ‘Book of Pheryllt‘ from the 16th century collection is attributed to a modern antiquarian Bard: Llywelyn Sion of Glamorgan, Wales. It is purportedly moved from the library of Owen Morgan “Morian” to the private collection of the Albion Lodge of the United Ancient Order of Druids of Oxford before coming into Monroe’s possession. Barddas, also by Llywelyn Sion, strongly influenced work of Douglas Monroe, neodruidism and the National Welsh Eisteddfod. In addition to Monroe‘s work, Barddas is highly recommended as a companion to the Pheryllt.

It became rapidly clear that to give the ‘Body of the Dragon’ its true justice, given the many diverse subjects and scattered references from Douglas Monroe’s trilogy and the mysterious manner which Bards conceal knowledge, that my facsimile of the Pheryllt material required more than one volume to be complete.

— Joshua Free

PHERYLLT_pb_cvr_frontcrop ADDITIONAL EDITOR’S NOTES: The reader will quickly find that much of the herbal lore, formulas and Ogham knowledge is held back from the first volume in order to establish proper roots of doctrine and tradition. As a debut volume it was important for it to carry integrity of authentic Welsh Bardism; not simply one more ‘book of shadows‘ on the market overrun by incense blends and notes for self-guided visualizations. How long it will take to bring this venture to its completion is another matter altogether. It has already taken years to muster the spiritual courage and mental fortitude to even consider such a feat, even though I am well versed in Douglas Monroe‘s specific brand of Druidry and have written extensively on the topic in previous books

“–Ac yna yr ordeinodd hi drwy gelfyddydd llyfrau Pheryllt I ferwi pair o Awen.”

“–So she (Ceridwen) took to the crafts of the Book of Pheryllt to boil a cauldron of Awen.”

– from the ‘Hanes Taliesen’, Peniarth MS

We have been given little in classical literature or even antiquarian druidism to satisfy hunger for Pheryllt (pronounced FAIR-ee-llt or VAIR-ult) research, and even less to support an in-depth critique of their founder, a figure named Pharaon (FAR-ah-on), and translated by some scholars to mean ‘higher powers‘. Perhaps it is ‘Druid Craft’ to call down ‘higher powers’ to conjure inspiration and magic – perhaps that is what Ceridwen is doing in the famous reference above. In either case, it has spawned an entire branch of modern druid methodology and a natural universalist philosophy even if only in spirit…