Draconomicon

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Draconomiconfrontthumb The ‘elements’ of the Druidic Tradition are far and beyond the simple spells and sorceries found through-out the last few thousand years – particularly since the ‘Dark Ages’ inflicted upon mankind by the Church. More than the commonly revived aspects of the past that have been reconstructed in this supposed ‘New Age’ based on what can serve our modern needs best, the wisdom of the Druids lingers on, ever-present to-day as it was thousands of years ago, to remind us of where we came from and what can best hope to carry forth to the future. The wisdom is simple – so simple that it has been lost on the ears of minds of countless generations since the public eradication of its carriers, forcing the knowledge (and those who could bare it) underground and fragmenting it forever. Now at the dawn of a ‘new era’ – a new ‘paradigm-shift’ in consciousness, it seems clearer now more than ever, that this unifying wholeness should remain the focus.

The subject of the dragon has appeared in and above the entire corpus draconium or ‘Body of the Dragon’, which is to say not only the “universe” and the material existence that we face everyday, but also the energetic currents of the “microcosmic” levels of the same reality, that human minds have ever fragmented into ‘separate’ factions; whether they be spiritual, religious, cosmological, bio-scientific or completely enshrouded in occult esoterica.

Inseparable from all of this – is the dragon.

Draconomiconfrontthumb The vision for a Draconomicon first emerged in 1995, when I was working with a group in Minneapolis known as the Mystics of the Earth (MOTE) but was not actually realized into existence until the following year when I (and the leadership of said group) moved to the Colorado Rocky Mountains, continuing the vision in the form of the Draconis Celtic Lodge of Druids (DCLOD). The new group was in part rooted in Pheryllt Dragon-Druidry (emphasized in the works of Douglas Monroe) as well as the Babylo-Sumerian paradigm put forth by “Simon’s” Necronomicon.

The Draconomicon released in 1996 (subtitled: Sanguis Draconis) was more like a fanciful “pamphlet” than an actual “book.” It summarized a very general background to “dragon lore” as well as the connections it has to both the ancient “Mesopotamian” worldview in addition to the more recent and “Druidic” paradigms that emerged seemingly from nowhere in places all over the globe, far and removed from the earlier and most ancient source tradition in Babylonia – one which went on to influence the Jews, Christians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Indians, Asiatic and American regions.

A far-sweeping influence concerning an ancient primordial and primeval dragon legacy cannot be dismissed. It is found at the core and heart of virtually every ancient pantheon, spirituality and belief system – regardless of how clearly or self-honestly it is met with by its seeker. The demonization of the dragon is something that the “Western World” has become all too familiar with as a result of polarized or dualistic doctrines of “good” versus “evil” that have become paramount to the existence of the more popular systems (Judeo-Christian, Zoroastrian, Islamic, etc.) operated in the current age.

Whether cosmological, used in the explanation of the “natural” phenomenon of the universe; or biological, illustrating the serpent-coil of genetic memory wound up in each of us; or esoteric, representative of the occult and underground mysteries that have ever been shielded from the eyes of men – the dragon and its call ring out loudly to those who would seek to understand the truth against the world and a self-honest participation with reality.

Draconomiconfrontthumb The newer, expanded and greatly improved version of the Draconomicon included within the present anthology is beyond what we might have thought to consolidate so concisely and simply for folk in the mid-1990’s, during a time when the occult age was overloaded with materials that composed Books of Shadows and Wiccan Spellbooks – the less “colorful” material from antiquity was mostly dismissed until the recent millennium when people began to look into the ancient religions and spiritual traditions of Mesopotamia and the “idea” that ancient aliens compose the originating pantheons of such “Sky God” traditions.

DRACONOMICON – as a title – can be translated in a variety of ways; drawing from the same semantic controversy the work known as the Necronomicon has. In some ways, an amateur might pass it off as simply a “Book of Dragons” (or Book of the Dragon), yet we have read and seen arguments of the semantics of “names,” meaning Book of Dragon Names (or Names of the Dragon). Further still there is the most distinctive “rites and laws” orientation – all of which will still beg the question of what we even mean when we refer to the dragon altogether!

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